All posts filed under: Singapore

All Around The World

While on Easter Island, we drove our rented ATV up the steep slopes of Rano Kau, a volcano near the main town of Hanga Roa. We came around a bend and eyed a dude ahead of us, running at a quick clip. Blake pulled up beside him. “Sir, are you okay? Is someone chasing you? Are you in distress?” He looked confused, and only at that point did we realize he was running by choice—jogging, if you will. It takes all kinds. We, meanwhile, strictly limited our running to once a location in order to bring you our trip in roughly 90 seconds:

Singapore: The Good, the Bad, and the Clean

If in the not so distant future—maybe on an episode of Black Mirror—Switzerland were taken over by Chinese people, you’d have an approximation of Singapore. It’s a weird place, guys. Weird-good and weird-bad. In the lead up to our trip, everyone we talked to who had been to Singapore was like, “…oh. How long? Three days, yeah, that’s okay, just go to eat.” So our expectations were low. But turns out Singapore is pretty okay! Blake, in fact, loved it, and lays out her case below in a series of “Pro” arguments. MacKenzie didn’t hate it either, but for the sake of debate, she’ll take the “Con” sections of this post. Pro: Singapore is clean and orderly as fuck. Allow me to go ahead and state the obvious first: it’s super nice to kick it in a city where there isn’t trash and dog excrement all over the sidewalks and the subways run like clockwork. As it turns out, a place becomes very approachable when there are rules and people follow the rules, even the …

MACKS Approved: Singapore

This is a long post because we basically did nothing in Singapore except for rampantly consume. You’ll also notice that most of our top picks are centered around the neighborhood of Joo Chiat, which is a bit off the beaten track for tourists and may just make all the difference between loving Singapore and hating Singapore. Click through for the full Google map. 1. Fei Fei Wanton Noodle House: You know that thing when you’re at a Chinese restaurant and you go, “Do we want the dumplings or the noodles?” Problem solved. 2. Old Skool Dessert House: This is where we got our chendol fix. They update the classics by subbing “snowflake,” a Taiwanese innovation that creates ribbons of creamy ice, for shaved ice. 3. Tian Tian Hainanese Chicken Rice: If “chicken rice” sounds bland and boring, the photos at Tian Tian make it look even more so. But this dish over-delivers, and that’s an understatement. The rice is buttery and garlicky; the chicken (opt for the roasted) is the platonic ideal of chicken. And …

The Cold Never Bothered Me Anyway: Singapore

Chendol, pictured above, is an old school Singaporean dessert, so fittingly we got ours at the Old Skool Dessert House in Joo Chiat. Every Southeast Asian nation has its own tweaked version of chendol/cendol, but this one consisted of ribbons of creamy, coconutty ice topped with gula melaka, which is sort of like molasses but is derived from palm sugar. Traditional accompaniments include adzuki beans, green gelatinous wormy things, and larger, orb-shaped white gelatinous things. Like many Asian desserts, “chewy” is the texture of choice. Ice kachang bears a resemblance to Hawaiian shave ice. Fluffy ice is drenched with syrups in flavors such as “pink” and “green.” Buried underneath you’ll find adzuki beans, more of those chewy white orbs, and, unexpectedly and unpleasantly, corn. This pineapple chili popsicle was fine, but extra points for matching MacKenzie’s nail color. We dropped 27 Singapore dollars at Sunday Folks, and we feel some shame about that. Each flavor of soft serve apparently comes with its own line up of included toppings (which is so not clear on the …

3/三/tiga/மூன்று from Singapore

Scene-setter(s): For your highbrow-ish literary fix, Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim; for your lowbrow-ish cinematic kicks, check out They Call Her Cleopatra Wong, starring Singapore’s Pam Grier, Marrie Lee. Pound-the-table recommendation: We were lucky enough to be hosted by friends-of-friends, Melinda and Nisid. Had we stayed in a hotel, we probably would not have discovered their charming and delicious neighborhood, Joo Chiat—pronounced “Jew chat”—which is a world away from Singapore’s weirdly futuristic downtown core and full of dreamy shop houses like this one: Back-pocket fact: Every visitor to Singapore has heard the warning, “Don’t chew gum/spit/traffic drugs or you’ll be publicly caned!” Actually, as our immigration forms warned us, the punishment for drug trafficking is death, but the public canings meted out for smaller offenses have less to do with pain and more to do with societal shame. And now, there’s an app for that! Or at least a website. Singapore’s heavily censored newspaper The Straits Times hosts STOMP, a site where people can upload snaps of fellow citizens behaving badly (jaywalking, eating on the subway, …