All posts filed under: Lima

Let’s Nerd Out Over Pre-Columbian Artifacts (Masturbation Sculptures Within!)

The Larco Museum is a fantastic place to spend a few hours if you’re the type who enjoys ABC Carpet & Home and the History Channel in equal measure. The museum offers visitors ice water subtly flavored with orange AND the grounds are beautiful—a lovely oasis in the middle of Lima—so what more could you want from an afternoon really? Below, some things we saw. …like this guy, crafted by the Moche people, who also made these water vessels/kettlebells, #isymfs. Apologies for the crappy image quality, but for all our fellow textile nerds, this scrap of fabric, woven by a Chincha artisan sometime between 1300 and 1500 AD, holds the world record for threads per linear inch, clocking in at 398. This series of strings and knots is a khipu, used by the Incas for various forms of record keeping such as tax payments. The position of the knots and lengths of the strings represent numerical values, sort of like a fiber-based abacus. There are also some spectacular examples of jewelry, such as this ensemble …

MACKS Approved: Lima, Peru

Lima! No one told us! We knew, of course, that it was a culinary capital in a Peruvian-food-is-the-new-New-Nordic-cuisine kind of way. But we’d also heard that the city itself was unwalkable, unlovable, unremarkable, a forgettable layover on the way to Machu Picchu. We decided to come for the food, which was every bit as good as expected, and ended up impressed by all the rest. Click through for our full map. 1. ámaZ: This resto charted at #9 on Blake’s latest Best Restaurants in the World list. The chef’s other, chichier restaurant is Malabar, which is on the San Pellegrino list and zzzzzzzzz. We purposefully avoided Lima’s pricier dining options, so this was our fanciest meal—and even then, it had whiffs of the Rainforest Cafe. But the food delivered, and now we can say we’ve eaten giant Amazonian snails. 2. Huaca Pucllana: Accessible ruins in Miraflores. Read all about ’em. 3. Larco Museum: If you go to one museum in Lima, make it this one. Perhaps that’s a biased recommendation seeing as we did, in …

Huaca Pucllana: Just Some Ruins In Your Neighb, NBD

Miraflores, the neighborhood in Lima where we stayed and spent much of our time, is a lovely, leafy, normal 21st century ‘hood with people on smart phones and a confusing number of Papa John’s. So it’s jarring to round a corner and find, in between high rises, ancient ruins dating from 500 AD. In fact, until 20 or so years ago, Huaca Pucllana—the size of a city block or two—was considered just an odd part of the neighborhood, largely ignored as a site of historical or cultural importance. It was that weird hill made of bricks that kids used for motocross (this is true) until excavation began in earnest in 1992. What archaeologists discovered was a huge compound, built in layers over time, that served as a ceremonial and administrative hub for the Lima people, who flourished between 100 and 650 AD. Some fun (fun?) Huaca P facts: -Much like Blake, the Limas loved a reno. Every ten to fifteen years, perhaps coinciding with a change in leadership, they would add a new layer to …

3/tres from Lima

Scene setter: While at the Ford Foundation, MacKenzie produced this video about grantee Tarcila Rivera. At age ten, she moved from her Andean town to Lima to work as a domestic servant, speaking only Quechua until she was 18. Today she is a leader in the indigenous rights movement and an all-around social justice badass. Pound-the-table recommendation: How do we express how much better than great the ceviche at Canta Rana in the Barranco District is? We were both doing the “how does this taste so good?” head shake as we worked through the fish, fried squid, avocado, corn, and sweet potato. We fought over the last drop of leche de tigre; Blake almost lost an eye. With sincere apologies to khao soi and chorizo sandwiches, it feels fair to call this dish—the ceviche apaltado con chicharrón, to be precise—the best casual food that we have eaten on our entire trip. We will, undoubtedly, make our way back to Lima under the guise of something “cultural” and eat ceviche twice daily for a week. Back-pocket …